Our Curriculum

Curriculum Intent  

Principles

Learning is a change to long-term memory. To this end, our aim is to ensure that our children experience a wide breadth of study and will have committed to their long-term memory an ambitious body of procedural and semantic knowledge (knowledge and skills).

 

Curriculum Intent

Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our children, our beliefs about high quality education and our values.

Cultural capital gives our children the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British Values.

 

Threshold Concepts

Threshold concept is the key understanding without which the learner cannot progress – a portal.

 

Milestones

These are the goals that the children should reach to show that they are meeting the expectations of our curriculum.

 

Assessment

We assess the outcomes for computing through our POP tasks which are built into our planning to help us assess how well and how deeply pupils know and understand what we have taught and what the children have learnt.

Curriculum Intent Statement

 

Art & Design

At Longvernal Primary School we value Art and Design as an important part of the children’s entitlement to a balanced, broad curriculum. Our high-quality art and design education engages, inspires and challenges pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they are able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.


Breadth of Study
Early Years Foundation Stage
At Longvernal Primary School our pupils explore and use a variety of media and materials through a combination of child initiated and adult directed activities. They have opportunities to learn to:

  • Explore the textures, movement, feel and look of different media and materials.
  • Respond to a range of media and materials, develop their understanding of them in order to manipulate and create different effects. 
  • Use different media and materials to express their own ideas.
  • Explore colour and use for a particular purpose.
  • Develop skills to use simple tools and techniques competently and appropriately.
  • Select appropriate media and techniques and adapt their work where necessary.

Key Stage 1
At Longvernal Primary School we teach our children to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products. We teach them to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space. Pupils also experience the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work. By investigating and exploring the work of a range of great artists, architects and designers the children can enhance their own learning through taking inspiration and ideas from those they have studied.
Key Stage 2
During their time in Key Stage 2, our pupils are taught to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas. They also learn how to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials, as well as learn about great artists, architects and designers in history. Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and threshold concepts which tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Our forwards and backwards engineering of the curriculum allows children to return to the same concepts over and over again, gradually building their understanding of them.
Threshold Concepts
We want our children to:

  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Milestones
At Longvernal Primary School, we help pupils progress in art by:

  • carefully sequencing the knowledge that they need to understand artistic concepts in our long term plans
  • by providing the vocabulary that they need to articulate their understanding of art
  • by providing the children with deliberate practice activities that will help them to make progress towards the milestones and remember what they have learnt

Computing

Principles
Learning is a change to long-term memory. To this end, our aim is to ensure that our children experience a wide breadth of study and will have committed to their long-term memory an ambitious body of procedural and semantic knowledge (knowledge and skills).
Curriculum Intent
Curriculum drivers shape our curriculum breadth. They are derived from an exploration of the backgrounds of our children, our beliefs about high quality education and our values.
Cultural capital gives our children the vital background knowledge required to be informed and thoughtful members of our community who understand and believe in British Values.
At Longvernal Primary School, we ensure that a high-quality computing education equips the children to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Our children are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, children will be equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing will also ensure that children become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through information and communication technology.
Breadth of Study
Key Stage 1
Children will be taught to:

  • understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • create and debug simple programs
  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content
  • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
  • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

Key Stage 2
Pupils should be taught to:

  • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output
  • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content
  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information
  • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and threshold concepts which tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Our forwards and backwards engineering of the curriculum allows children to return to the same concepts over and over again, gradually building their understanding of them.
Threshold Concepts
We want our children to:

  • understand and apply the concepts of logic, algorithms and data representation
  • analyse problems and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs
  • evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • be responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

Milestones
These are the goals that the children should reach to show that they are meeting the expectations of our curriculum.
At Longvernal Primary School, we help pupils progress in computing by:

  • carefully sequencing the knowledge that they need to understand computing concepts in our long term plans
  • by providing the vocabulary that they need to articulate their understanding of computing
  • by providing the children with deliberate practice activities that will help them to make progress towards the milestones and remember what they have learnt

Assessment
We assess the outcomes for computing through our POP tasks which are built into our planning to help us assess how well and how deeply pupils know and understand what we have taught and what the children have learnt.

Design & Technology

At Longvernal Primary School, Design and Technology (DT) is an inspiring and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on other subjects such as mathematics, science, computing and art.

Breadth of Study
Key Stage 1

Design

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology

Make

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristic

Evaluate

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria
  • Technical knowledge build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable explore and use mechanisms in their products.

Key Stage 2

Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design

Make

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks accurately
  • select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work
  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world

Technical knowledge

  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures
  • understand and use mechanical systems in their products
  • understand and use electrical systems in their products
  • apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

Cooking and nutrition

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

Key Stage 1

  • use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes
  • understand where food comes from.

Key Stage 2

  • understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet
  • prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques
  • understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and threshold concepts which tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Our forwards and backwards engineering of the curriculum allows children to return to the same concepts over and over again, gradually building their understanding of them.

Threshold Concepts

We want our children to:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

Milestones

At Longvernal Primary School, we help pupils progress in design and technology by:

  • carefully sequencing the knowledge that they need to understand DT concepts in our long term plans
  • by providing the vocabulary that they need to articulate their understanding of DT
  • by providing the children with deliberate practice activities that will help them to make progress towards the milestones and remember what they have learnt.

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

At Longvernal, we strive for children to be happy, confident and resilient individuals with an enthusiastic love for learning. We provide a holistic, safe and secure environment, both indoors and outdoors. This allows children to flourish in all aspects of their development, whilst exploring their individual interests.
We believe that children should be provided with rich resources so they can learn through their play. Ultimately, learning should be fun, stimulating and engaging for the children whilst providing suitable challenges.
We value the importance of our outdoor learning environment and our weekly Forest School lessons as we believe it helps children develop their confidence, autonomy, problem solving and risk taking skills.
In the Early Years at Longvernal, we are committed to providing the best possible introduction to school life, encompassing teaching children skills and sharing experiences which will ensure their positive well-being and success in the future.

English

In line with all the primary schools across the Midsomer Norton Schools’ Partnership, our curriculum is currently under review. The documents included in this section will be updated to reflect our practice going forward; additionally the English Policy will be reviewed annually.

Writing:

We encourage children to write from an early age in a variety of ways using a multi-sensory approach: painting; drawing letters/shapes in sand/salt/flour; felt pens; large sheets of paper; chalks on the groundoutside etc. Children progress to using whiteboards and pens to practise individual letter formation in line with the phonics programme- representing phonemes with graphemes from the early days in Reception.
From Nursery we seek to identify a child’s preferred grip and intervention is put in place where there is difficulty or fine motor skill challenges. These skills then support children in developing their independent writing of simple sentences which can be read to themselves and others. Emergent writing is celebrated with opportunities provided for writing for a purpose. This approach continues up through the school with writing linked to the wider curriculum and a range of stimuli including quality literature. From Year 1, children are taught to use a pre-cursive font to enable them to progress smoothly to full cursive. Individual needs are catered for with regard to fine motor skill support and teachers are aware of individual pupil’s preferred pencil grip and whether they are right or left-handed. We use a variety of models for teaching writing: teacher modelling shared writing; supported composition; guided and independent writing. The skills that children will acquire will inform their ability to communicate effectively whilst Writing to Entertain, Writing to Inform, Writing to Persuade and Writing to Discuss. There is a focus on children editing and improving their work through guided editing sheets initially, leading to ‘Editing Stations’ from Year 4 onwards. The aim is for the end product to be of the highest quality by ‘publication’. Additionally,children in Key Stage 2 have regular, less structured Creative Writing sessions to express themselves in a chosen genre. Alongside this, children are taught discrete lessons for grammar, punctuation, spelling and handwriting though these are also explored both implicitly and explicitly in Writing and Reading lessons.

Reading:
The sequence of reading books show a cumulative progression in phonics knowledge that is matched to our Read, Write, Inc. phonics programme, meaning that the book a child is expected to read matches the phoneme correspondences which they know. Children re-read these books to encourage fluency. Along with these phonetically decodable books, children also take home a book simply to enjoy. It is made explicit, using a colour-coded book mark, which book is for adults to read and share with their child. It is through sharing books that children’s vocabulary is broadened, cultural capital is built and a love of reading is nurtured. Each class has a dedicated reading corner and, in addition, we have a new reading house in
which to promote a love of books and storytelling.
Every class has a dedicated whole class Guided Reading session which is informal in Reception and Year 1, gradually becoming more focused around identified reading objectives as they proceed through the school. The aim is for all children to benefit from exposure to a broad range of quality texts both to expand their knowledge of the world and their vocabulary so that no child is disadvantaged, irrespective of their starting points. Reading lessons are structured to cover skills including inference, prediction, retrieval, explanation and summarising. Importantly, every class enjoys a daily story session of 20 minutes where an adult models reading aloud including characterisation, modulation and fluency.

Phonics:
We follow the Read, Write, Inc. programme. This is taught in daily discrete lessons from the very beginning of Reception until children can read fluently. There are clear term by term expectations of progress from Reception to Year 2. Continuous assessment quickly identifies where learners have not fully grasped each phoneme. The aim is for all children to ‘keep up’ rather than have to ‘catch up’ with same day intervention and a whole class approach together with targeted adult support as required.  Speed Sound phonic charts are used in all classes throughout the school to support a strategic approach to spelling. At the end of Year 1, all children are given a Phonics Screening Check to ensure they have mastered the appropriate
knowledge.

Spelling:

To help children learn and improve their spellings we use Read Write Inc Spelling which complements our phonics programme until the end of Key Stage 2. In a series of discrete 15-minute lessons, pupils are introduced to spelling rules in line with the Year 2 curriculum. In Key Stage 2 we use No Nonsense Spelling.
This approach encourages children to apply spelling at the point of writing using the Speed Sound Chart and a ‘have a go’ approach in their ‘Spelling Matters’ book. Children’s individual spellings include ‘cued’ spellings from their personal errors, curriculum words, common exception words and words form the statutory word list for their year group. We no longer set 10 spellings a week, aiming instead for fewer words but with the aim of children embedding these in their long term memory; once learnt, they are leant for ever- and applying them to their writing.

Geography

At Longvernal Primary School, we ensure that we inspire in children a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching equips our children with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes.
Our curriculum breadth is adapted to the context of our school to secure pupils’ social and cultural development by placing a particular focus on vocabulary and providing experiences that our pupils may not otherwise be exposed to such as visiting We the Curious and Bristol Zoo.
The curriculum is sequenced in long and medium-term plans to help pupils build cumulative knowledge towards agreed milestones or expected standards, creating a secure schema on which to build throughout their school career. The key subject content is organised through threshold concepts which organise new knowledge systematically and ensure a logical progression. In keeping with recent research into meta-cognition, to ensure their learning is embedded, quizzes and other low stakes tests are a regular feature of lessons. Our curriculum design helps pupils to read widely by ensuring high quality texts such Shackleton’s Journey that relate to geography are studied during Whole Class Guided Reading.

History

At Longvernal Primary School, we give our children a high-quality history education which helps them gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. We inspire children’s curiosity to know more about the past, which equips children to ask questions and think critically, helping children to understand people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity.

The curriculum breadth is adapted to the context of our school to secure pupils’ social and cultural development by placing a particular focus on vocabulary and providing experiences to which our pupils may not otherwise be exposed. For example, visiting the Roman Baths or spending a day as a Victorian school pupil. Further to this, we ensure our ambitious curriculum is accessed by all children - including those with SEND - by providing pre and post teaching in addition to scaffolding so that they can keep up and not have to catch up.

The curriculum is sequenced in long and medium-term plans to help pupils build cumulative knowledge towards agreed milestones or expected standards, creating a secure schema on which to build throughout their school career. The key subject content is organised through threshold concepts which organise new knowledge systematically and ensure a logical progression. In keeping with recent research into meta- cognition, to ensure their learning is embedded, quizzes are tasks are a regular feature of lessons. Our curriculum design helps pupils to read widely by ensuring high quality texts such Good Night Mr Tom that relate to History are studied during Whole Class Guided Reading.

Maths

Our curriculum intent for maths reflects the purpose and aims of the national curriculum by helping our pupils to:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately
  • reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language
  • solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

The Maths curriculum breadth is adapted to the context of our school by focussing on a progression of knowledge and skills from EYFS to Year 6. The most important subject content is organised through ‘threshold concepts’ which organise new knowledge systematically and ensure a logical progression.

The Mathematical threshold concepts are:

  • Number and Place Value
  • Addition and Subtraction
  • Multiplication and Division
  • Fractions, Decimals and Percentages
  • Geometry (Shape)
  • Geometry (Position, Direction and Movement)
  • Measure
  • Statistics
  • Algebra

The progression of learning is based on the White Rose Hub Schemes of Learning Small Steps, where the National Curriculum objectives are met. The Maths curriculum is sequenced into long and medium term plans to help pupils build cumulative knowledge towards expected National Curriculum attainment targets for Maths.


Pupils are assessed using mastery tasks from White Rose Hub and reasoning questions as proof of progress in the specific threshold concept.

The curriculum design for mathematics reflects the importance of spoken language in pupils’ development across the whole curriculum – cognitively, socially and linguistically. The quality and variety of language that pupils hear and speak are key factors in developing their mathematical vocabulary and presenting a mathematical justification, argument or proof; assisted in making their thinking clear to themselves as well as others, and teachers should ensure that pupils build secure foundations by using discussion to probe and remedy their misconceptions.

Any pupils who have gaps in their skills and knowledge, or any children who are socially disadvantaged, are ensured a rich maths curriculum through our teaching strategies, resources and knowledge of the importance of recall. Teachers model learning through clear explanations and instruction, scaffold tasks so that all children can work at the expected level and identify gaps in learning or misconceptions that children may have before a unit of work. The importance of pre- and post-teaching is considered within mathematical interventions, so that children are familiar with the concepts and vocabulary expected of their age range.

Music

At Longvernal Primary School, we believe that music is a powerful and unique form of communication that can change the way pupils feel, think and act. It brings together feeling and intellect, enabling personal expression, reflection and emotional development. Music is an integral part of culture, past and present, and helps pupils understand the importance of the development of musical styles throughout history. Our Music Curriculum at Longvernal is designed to progressively develop children’s skills in all areas of musicality. We consider the appreciation of music (both listening and discussing a range of different musical styles), performances with voice and a range of instruments, composition and styling, as well as
recording and evaluating our own musical performances. We like to encourage our children to take inspiration from key musicians and how exploration into the work of others can help to develop our own approach to musical compositions and play.

Breadth of Study
Key Stage 1
Children will be taught to:

  • use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes
  • play tuned and untuned instruments musically
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music
  • experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.

Key Stage 2
Children will be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians
  • develop an understanding of the history of music.

Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and threshold concepts which tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Our forwards and backwards engineering of the curriculum allows children to return to the same concepts over and over again, gradually building their understanding of them. We ensure that children progressively develop their skills in all areas of music.

Threshold Concepts
We want our children to:

  • perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians
  • Learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence according to their abilities. Each child is expected to experience positive progress in the realms of their musical understanding.
  • Understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the inter-related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

Milestones
At Longvernal Primary School, we help pupils progress in music by:

  • Carefully sequencing the knowledge that they need to understand music concepts in our long term plans (we use our access to the BANES Hub Online system of Charanga). We return to specific areas of learning regularly to ensure clear understanding of learning.
  • By providing the vocabulary and language that they need to articulate their understanding of music. Children are expected to be able to apply and define this vocabulary independently.
  • By providing the children with deliberate practice activities that will help them to make progress towards the milestones and remember what they have learnt. We recognise that revisiting learning is extremely beneficial in aiding learning and the impact on long term memory.

 

Personal, Social and Health Education (PHSE)

PSHE education helps pupils to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to manage life’s challenges and make the most of life’s opportunities. At Longvernal, our curriculum is based on national and, where appropriate, local initiatives/challenges. We believe that by teaching our pupils to be responsible citizens, informing them how to keep healthy, develop resilience, mutual respect for others and how to make the correct choices they will be well prepared for the world in which we live. We have used research and resources from the PSHE Association to support our approach to the delivery of PSHE.


There is evidence to show that PSHE education can address teenage pregnancy, substance misuse, unhealthy eating, lack of physical activity, emotional health and other key issues. An effective PSHE programme can also tackle barriers to learning, raise aspirations and improve the life chances of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged pupils.


Under section 78 of the Education Act 2002 and the Academies Act 2010, schools must provide a ‘balanced and broadly-based curriculum’ which promotes ‘…the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society, and prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life’.
PSHE education makes a major contribution to schools fulfilling this duty.


In addition to the above, our PSHE curriculum is also supported by the Jigsaw programme which is divided into six jigsaw pieces:

  • Being Me in My World
  • Celebrating Differences
  • Dreams and Goals
  • Healthy Me
  • Relationships
  • Changing Me

The above values are embedded beyond the classroom through our themed assemblies and active School Council and Equalities Team. Underlying all we do in the ‘Longvernal Family’ is the core belief:
‘It’s good to be me!’

Personal Development Overview

Click here for Longvernal's Personal Development overview

Physical Education (PE)

Our curriculum intent for physical education reflects the purpose and aims of the national curriculum by inspiring all pupils to triumph in competitive sport and other physically-demanding activities. The curriculum breadth is adapted to the context of our school to ensure that all pupils become physically confident, allowing them to live healthy lives. The physical education curriculum is sequenced in long and medium term plans to provide pupils with cumulative knowledge towards agreed milestones, whilst also ensuring that pupils receive access to a wide range of sports and physical activities throughout their primary school years. As a school, we actively seek opportunities to compete in sport to support children in learning important values such as teamwork, fairness, confidence and respect.

Religious Education (RE)

Our curriculum intent for R.E reflects the purpose and aims of the National Curriculum by provoking challenging questions about; meaning and purpose in life, beliefs about God, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human.

In R.E, children learn about religions and worldviews in local, national and global contexts. They are encouraged to evaluate different sources and develop their own ideas, while at the same time respecting the rights of others to differ.

The curriculum breadth is adapted to the context of our secular school by covering a range of world religions and also non-religious views - for example, Humanism. It develops pupils’ understanding of fundamental British Values alongside an appreciation of different religious and world views. For instance, through weekly whole-school assemblies, our displays and class-based teaching. The ultimate aim is thatthis should enable pupils to participate positively and respectfully in our society, with its diverse religious and non-religious views.

The curriculum is sequenced in long and medium term plans to help pupils build cumulative knowledge towards agreed milestones, with planned-in ‘POP tasks’ to track that learning is secure. The subject knowledge is organised systematically across both Key Stages to ensure logical progression, through five threshold concepts: ‘Understanding beliefs’, ‘Understanding how beliefs are conveyed’, ‘Understanding practices and lifestyles’,’ Understanding values’ and ‘Reflect’.

The curriculum design helps pupils to read widely by exposing them to stories from a range of religions and cultures. Key events associated with different religious / non-religious views are available for all pupils to access, for example through our Harvest Festival, singing assemblies (which incorporate songs from a variety of religions and cultures) and regular assemblies regarding different religious festivals. There is also the opportunity for all children and their families to share a Christmas meal and guest speakers contribute in class or in assemblies regarding different beliefs and outlooks.

Science

A high quality science curriculum provides the building blocks for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Through the exploration of key knowledge and concepts, the children recognise the power of explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about science. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes. We develop children’s knowledge and skills, enabling them to make sense of the world through investigation, as well as using and applying process skills. Children are exposed to learning experiences both inside and outside the classroom (during ForestSchool), thus developing their scientific enquiry and investigative skills and broadening their scientific vocabulary.

Breadth of Study
Key Stage 1
Working Scientifically
During years 1 and 2, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways
  • observing closely, using simple equipment
  • performing simple tests
  • identifying and classifying
  • using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions
  • gathering and recording data to help in answering question

Year 1
Plants
Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees
  • identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees,animals, including humans

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and name a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals
  • identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores
  • describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals including pets)
  • identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense

Everyday materials
Pupils should be taught to:

  • distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made
  • identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock
  • describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials
  • compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties

Seasonal Changes
Pupils should be taught to:

  • observe changes across the 4 seasons
  • observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies

Year 2
Living things and their habitats
Pupils should be taught to:

  • explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive
  • identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, and how they depend on each other
  • identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including microhabitats
  • describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food

Plants
Pupils should be taught to:

  • observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants
  • find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy

Animals, including humans
Pupils should be taught to:

  • notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults
  • find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air)
  • describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene

Uses of everyday materials
Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses
  • find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching

Lower Key Stage 2
Working Scientifically
During years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate
  • measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

Year 3
Plants
Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers
  • explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant
  • investigate the way in which water is transported within plants
  • explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal

Animals, including humans
Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
  • identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement

Rocks
Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties
  • describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock
  • recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter

Light
Pupils should be taught to:
 recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light
 notice that light is reflected from surfaces
 recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes
 recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by an opaque object
 find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change

Forces and magnets
Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare how things move on different surfaces
  • notice that some forces need contact between 2 objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance
  • observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others
  • compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials
  • describe magnets as having 2 poles
  • predict whether 2 magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing

Year 4
Living things and their habitats
Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways
  • explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment
  • recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things

Animals, including humans
Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans
  • identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions
  • construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey

States of matter
Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases
  • observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius (°C)
  • identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature

Sound
Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating
  • recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear
  • find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it
  • find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it
  • recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases

Electricity
Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify common appliances that run on electricity
  • construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers
  • identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery
  • recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit
  • recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors

Upper Key Stage 2
Working Scientifically
During years 5 and 6, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels,classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs
  • using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests
  • reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and a degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations
  • identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

Year 5
Living things and their habitats
Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird
  • describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals

Animals, including humans
Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the changes as humans develop to old age

Properties and changes of materials
Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets
  • know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution
  • use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating
  • give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic
  • demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes
  • explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda

Earth and Space
Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the movement of the Earth and other planets relative to the sun in the solar system
  • describe the movement of the moon relative to the Earth
  • describe the sun, Earth and moon as approximately spherical bodies
  • use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sunacross the sky

Forces
Pupils should be taught to:

  • explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object
  • identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces
  • recognise that some mechanisms including levers, pulleys and gears allow a smaller force to have a greater effect

Year 6
Living things and their habitats
Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals
  • give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics

Animals, including humans
Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood
  • recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function
  • describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans

Evolutions and inheritance
Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago
  • recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents
  • identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution

Light
Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines
  • use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye
  • explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes
  • use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them

Electricity
Pupils should be taught to:

  • associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit
  • compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches
  • use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram

Our curriculum distinguishes between subject topics and threshold concepts which tie together the subject topics into meaningful schema. The same concepts are explored in a wide breadth of topics. Our forwards and backwards engineering of the curriculum allows children to return to the same concepts over and over again, gradually building their understanding of them.

Threshold Concepts
We want our children to:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future

Milestones
At Longvernal Primary School, we help pupils progress in Science by:

  • carefully building upon the knowledge they have, year upon year. This is sequenced and developed as part of our long term plans.
  • providing children with the opportunities to investigate and explore science using their acquired skills and knowledge.
  • Providing the children with and encouraging them to use appropriate scientific vocabulary to articulate their understanding of science
  • Providing children with well- planned and resourced learning opportunities to ensure they make progress towards the milestones and committing their learning to memory.

Special Educational Needs (SEN)

Longvernal Primary School is committed to providing a full curriculum to all pupils. We believe that children learn best in a warm, caring environment where every effort is made to foster strong relationships between children, adults, and the community. We believe in the importance of positive self-esteem for all children. Our school aims to build a supportive, caring community within which all members recognise the dignity, rights, cultures, and attitudes of others and work together in an atmosphere of mutual self-respect. We seek to establish a culture which encourages each one of us to realise our full potential, to make use of our special talents and to strive for the fulfilment that comes from achieving individual excellence.

For all learners, we believe that high-quality teaching is vital for all children to achieve. However, for some children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) there are times when further,additional support may be needed for to help them achieve their targets. All interventions and additional provisions are set according to individual needs and include working alongside external professionals such as : educational psychologists, occupational therapists, speech and language therapists and play therapists. Each additional intervention is monitored and tracked by the SENCo, class teacher and SLT. To find out more about our highly inclusive school, please read our:
● SEN information report
● SEN Policy
Please click here to find the ‘local offer’ of special educational needs provision for families living in BANES: http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/localoffer